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Tooth Extraction (Simple or Surgical Exodontia, Wisdom Teeth Removal)

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About Tooth Extractions

In certain instances, a tooth may be so damaged or failing beyond repair that the tooth must be extracted. The tooth could be causing extreme pain, discomfort, or infection. If any of these situations arise, an exam from the dentist will determine if a tooth extraction is the best option and that the entire tooth will be removed from the jawbones. A general dentist can perform one of two types of extractions: simple or surgical. Simple extraction is a quick process to remove a tooth that’s visible in the mouth and surgical is for teeth that aren’t visible yet, such as the wisdom teeth.

What to Expect

Depending on whether the dentist performs a simple or surgical tooth extraction, the technique and experience will differ. In either case, there will be a thorough examination prior to extraction when X-rays will be taken to determine the type of extraction needed. In addition, the patient is usually offered a form of sedation to help the patient feel comfortable and at ease during the procedure. It’s advised that the patient not eat or drink anything for 6 – 8 hours before the surgery. If a patient experiences nausea or vomiting before the extraction, they will need to call the dentist’s office to possibly reschedule to avoid health complications. Smoking on the day of surgery is prohibited because of the risks and complications it can pose in the healing process.

Treatment Aftercare

After either type of extraction, a blood clot will usually form in the socket of the removed tooth. After a simple extraction, the dentist will pack the area with gauze and have the patient bite down in order to stop bleeding. With surgical extraction, the dentist will stitch the area and then place the gauze pads. After extraction, the patient should refrain from unnecessary eating, drinking, or talking for at least 2 hours. After the bleeding has stopped, the patient should drink plenty of cold or lukewarm fluids.

On the first day after the extraction, only soft foods should be eaten and the patient shouldn’t brush or rinse their teeth for 12 hours following the extraction. When brushing is resumed, the extraction area should be avoided with the toothbrush, but the area can be gently rinsed with salt water. The patient also shouldn’t spit forcefully, which may dislodge the blood clot. The healing process usually starts about 1 – 2 weeks following the tooth extraction. This is the time when new gum tissue and bone will fill in the gap where the tooth or teeth have been removed. After about 3 – 4 weeks, the gums should be fully healed. Complete healing of the entire mouth can take up to 6 months, but it varies from person to person.

Insurance Coverage

There are several factors that determine how much a tooth extraction will cost, such as the type of extraction, the difficulty of removing the tooth, and how many teeth will be extracted. On average, a patient may pay from $130 to $250 for a simple extraction. A surgical extraction can cost between $180 and $400. During the patient’s consultation, the dentist will provide a breakdown of pricing. Our front office can also check with the patient’s insurance carrier since many dental insurance plans will pay up to 80% of the cost  if the surgery is a medical necessity.

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If you think that you could benefit from a tooth extraction, we would be more than happy to assist you. Give our friendly staff a call today, so we can schedule your consultation immediately. During your consultation, the dentist can give you all of the information you need about tooth extraction to help you make an informed decision.

*Individual results are not guaranteed and may vary from person to person. Images may contain models.

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